Being a historian at Cubitt Town Junior School

To understand history is to better understand ourselves. Based upon the requirements of the national curriculum as well as what we felt were the most relevant topics for our community, our curriculum travels from pre-historic societies to the modern age. Key themes reoccur across our coverage of history including Who we are, Peace and Conflict, Justice & Fairness and Power & Governance. These act as threads that weave between different topics and areas of study. We want the study of history to be as immersive as possible and take advantage of our location in London to undertake frequent educational visits to bring history to life.

Historical skills are developed year-on-year in a progressive manner, so that our pupils develop confidence with historical themes and concepts, as outlined in our progression in skills document. Alongside the historical skills, we also believe that there are a bank of facts that all our pupils should know prior to transition to secondary school. These are clearly documented in our curriculum maps. Knowledge organisers at the start of each unit of work provide an easy-to-refer-to resource in each pupil's book. History units of work are sequenced so that each lesson builds upon the last. Regular oral recall of learnt knowledge is used to help understanding and retention, and each lesson begins by recapping prior learning. End of unit outcomes relating to an overarching historical question (tests, quizzes, essays, spoken accounts) are used to assess pupil's progress.

Oracy drives learning at Cubitt Town and within the humanities, we ensure that children are empowered to use their voice to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.

We want our pupils to develop a critical historical eye and be able to highlight the reliability and trustworthiness of different historical sources and accounts. This involves the acknowledgement of bias in historical reporting, and the understanding that there is not one correct reading of history. Indeed, part of being a historian at Cubitt Town is developing the faculties to empathise and understand that different individuals and groups of people experience historical periods in markedly different ways. This includes experiences based on nationality, ethnicity, gender, and economic position. Our choice of topics and key texts have also been specifically chosen to appropriately reflect the experiences of black and minority ethnic communities. We want all of our pupils to feel reflected and included in our history curriculum and feel a sense of belonging and identity in the UK.

Being a geographer at Cubitt Town Junior School

At Cubitt Town, our geography curriculum is curated in an outward looking manner, placing our children's lived experience within the wider world. We aim to compare the local to the global, covering geographical issues and themes within our own borough, city and country, alongside regular studies of other countries and regions around the world. We have a particular focus on South Asia given the proportion of our school community with familial ties to Bangladesh and India.

We study human and physical geography alongside an emphasis on geographical enquiry. Each year group undertakes a longitudinal geographical study, collecting, analysing and evaluating their own primary data. Geographical skills are developed year-on-year in a progressive manner, so that our children develop confidence with geographical themes and concepts, as outlined in our progression in skills document.

As with our curriculum more broadly, we want to engender the belief in our children that they have the capacity to shape the world in which they live. Social Action Projects linked to environmental issues close to home and further afield give children the ability to plan for and carry out activities with the aim of making improvements to our world.

Oracy drives learning at Cubitt Town and within the humanities, we ensure that children are empowered to use their voice to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. We want the study of geography to be as immersive as possible and take advantage of our location in London to undertake frequent educational visits to bring geography to life.

Alongside the geographical skills, we also believe that there are a bank of geographical facts that all our children should know prior to transition to secondary school. These are clearly documented in our curriculum maps. Knowledge organisers at the start of each unit of work provide an easy-to-refer-to resource in each child's book. Geography units of work are sequenced so that each lesson builds upon the last. Regular oral recall of learnt knowledge is used to help understanding and retention. End of unit outcomes (tests, quizzes, essays, spoken accounts) are used to assess children's progress.